Free PDF Books on race, gender, sexuality, class, and culture

hitt-romney:

The Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

Angela Y. Davis - Are Prisons Obsolete?

Angela Y. Davis - Race, Women, and Class

The Communist Manifesto - Marx and Engels

Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde

Three Guineas by Virginia Woolf

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic

The Black Image in the White Mind: Media and Race in America- Robert M. Entman and Andrew Rojecki

Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism - bell hooks

Feminism is for Everybody - bell hooks

outlaw culture - bell hooks

Faces at the Bottom of the Well - Derrick Bell

Sex, Power, and Consent - Anastasia Powell

I am Your Sister - Audre Lorde

Patricia Hill Collins - Black Feminist Thought

Gender Trouble - Judith Butler

Four books by Frantz Fanon

Their Eyes Were Watching God - Zora Neale Hurston

Medical Apartheid - Harriet Washington

Fear of a Queer Planet: Queer Politics and Social Theory  - edited by Michael Warner

Colonialism/Postcolonialism - Ania Loomba

Discipline and Punish - Michel Foucault

The Gloria Anzaldua Reader

Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? by Mark Fisher

This Bridge Called by Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color by Cherríe Moraga & Gloria Anzaldúa

What is Cultural Studies? - John Storey

Cultural Theory and Popular Culture - John Storey

The Disability Studies Reader

Michel Foucault - Interviews and Other Writings

Michel Foucault - The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3 

 

This website here also has a lot more.

comicsbynia:

Here’s a comic I made a long time ago and never published. The text is from the introduction to A New Queer Agenda by Joseph N. DeFilippis.

These Women have Changed the World with Science - Too Bad a Man was Given all Credit
Graham vents, dysphoria edition.

Got a haircut without incident, and I really like it. But I’m having a strange amount of dysphoria about stuff that usually doesn’t bother me all that much. Namely that i have a narrow, “feminine” neck. It’s not something I’ve ever thought about before, but now everything else I’m dysphoric about comes roaring to the foreground of my mind. My hips are too wide and my shoulders too narrow. And while recently I’ve begun to like my jawline and cheekbones, I don’t like the fat distribution in my face. And then I notice, not for the first time, that my forehead and jaw look quite a bit like my older, deceased sister. Down to the texture of my skin. If I went on testosterone, would that change? I feel guilty about wanting to change, and I feel confused about wanting to see some semblance of her in the mirror. 

I started binding because I thought “If my chest just looks flat I’ll be okay, I don’t need hormones and surgery”. And here I am, wanting both anyway, because binding isn’t enough anymore. I’m afraid that if I start to “correct” more of the things I feel dysphoric about, I’m just going to find other things about myself to hate, and I’ll have dismantled my life only to find it still in shambles. I’m starting to feel like a condemned building. A coat of paint and some new lights aren’t solving the problem. 

[it doesn’t help that I’m 21 and jealous of trans people half my age. I’ve known I was trans since at least 2009, had a loudly lurking sense of it many years before then, but haven’t gotten anywhere. these kids are already “post transition”, whatever the fuck that means. I’m bitter and angry and then I’m disappointed in/pissed off at myself that I’m bitter. Slightly exaggerating about these people being half my age. I just feel really old and awkward sometimes, like I’m missed the boat on a “normal” adolescence/teen years and everything that comes with it. but maybe everyone feels like this. I really don’t know.]

I tried to register to vote three times when I was in college. Each time I failed to pass the “literacy” test. Only after the passage of the Voting Rights Act was I registered, and thank God Almighty, my parents voted as well. They were not activists but ordinary folks who wanted the same rights as the white people. Today, I feel the scabs coming off the old wounds and they are bleeding again. I knew people who were asked how many bubbles are in a bar of soap, or how many grains of sand are in a quart jar as part of their literacy test. I remember that the names of those who attempted to register were run in the local newspapers so that, by law, any registered (read white) voter could challenge their moral fitness to become voters. The real reason was to publicize who they were so their employers and Ku Klux Klan neighbors could take actions against them for having the nerve to think they should have the rights reserved for whites.

So much of our focus is on what the law did to help to emancipate generations of African Americans. However, the deep scars are still there in the form of emotional trauma (some friends of mine suffer from post-traumatic stress syndrome), loss of family to death, broken dreams, ruined lives, and consigned once again to second and third class citizenship.

This is why I mourn today because the conditions for so many have not changed that much. Moreover, the gains we won continue to erode as we see in the dismantling of the most important piece of legislation on racial equality of my lifetime.

Civil Rights Veteran and SNCC Member Joyce Ladner addressed the Supreme Court’s Voting Rights decision. (via legolaswhisperingelvenprayers)
rollingstone:

“Michael Hastings did not write to make friends, but if you were his friend, he was an inspiring and exciting and original and deeply lovable guy.” - Rachel Maddow, who paid moving tribute to Michael Hastings last night on MSNBC.
Select work by Hastings:The Runaway General: the 2010 profile that took down General Stanley McChrystal.Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview: Hastings’ 2012 interview where the WikiLeaks founder talks about the future of journalism.The Rise of the Killer Drones: Hastings’ 2012 piece on how killing by remote control has changed the way we fight.America’s Last Prisoner of War: Hastings’ 2012 investigative piece on a soldier that became a crucial pawn in negotiations to end the Iraq War.More here.

rollingstone:

Michael Hastings did not write to make friends, but if you were his friend, he was an inspiring and exciting and original and deeply lovable guy.” - Rachel Maddow, who paid moving tribute to Michael Hastings last night on MSNBC.

Select work by Hastings:
The Runaway General: the 2010 profile that took down General Stanley McChrystal.
Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview: Hastings’ 2012 interview where the WikiLeaks founder talks about the future of journalism.
The Rise of the Killer Drones: Hastings’ 2012 piece on how killing by remote control has changed the way we fight.
America’s Last Prisoner of War: Hastings’ 2012 investigative piece on a soldier that became a crucial pawn in negotiations to end the Iraq War.
More here.

elliottdeline:

So I didn’t sell as many books as I hoped to at the Philly Trans-Health Conference. We had to leave a day early for our march at Syracuse Pride, and I guess most sales happen on Saturday. Don’t get me wrong, it was a great time—but I’ve got a lot of books lying around now. As some of you know, I…

horror and feminist film criticism: a resources post

condesces:

a couple notes: i have not read all of these, so i can’t guarantee they are all perfect. they may involve problematic terms or conceptions. several of these focus on tropes of slasher films (epitomized by carpenter’s halloween) but can serve as helpful resources for any feminist analysis of horror, particularly objectification, sexualization, dehumanization, and gender/sex in horror.

HANNIBAL:

american psychos: serial killers in contemporary fiction, by jane caputi.

deposing an american cultural totem: clarice starling and postmodern heroism in thomas harris’s red dragon, the silence of the lambs, and hannibal, by stephen m. fuller.

‘seeing the female body differently’: gender issues in the silence of the lambs, by diane dubois.

american gothic: liminality in thomas harris’s hannibal lecter novels, by peter messent.

do you want to watch? a study of the visual rhetoric of the postmodern horror film, by jody keisner.

HORROR AND SLASHER FILMS:

visual pleasure and narrative cinema, by laura mulvey. the foundational text on feminist film criticism, drawing from freud and the idea of the castration complex (linked below).

her body, himself, by carol clover. one of the seminal analyses on gender and sex in slasher films and the horror genre. 

horror and the monstrous-feminine, by barbara creed. expansion of gender and sex in the slasher film and horror genre; the womb as the site of horror, rather than the castration threat.

masculinity and monstrosity: characterization and identification in the slasher film, by klaus rieser. discussion of the process of identification with characters by a presumed male audience and the complexities and implications of that identification.

the passing of the oedipal complex, by sigmund freud. the basics of the horror of the female genitals/castration complex. (used as groundwork for feminist film critique.)

masculinity in video games: the gendered gameplay of silent hill, by ewan kirkland.

razors in the dreamscape: revisiting a nightmare on elm street and the slasher film, by james kendrick.

final girls and terrible youth: transgression in 1980s slasher horror, by sarah trencansky.

patriarchy and the horror of the monstrous feminine: a comparative study of the ring and ringu, by valerie wee.

punkiraq:

what if hannibal gave a guest talk at the academy and started it off with
“good morning my name is hannibal lecter and welcome to my hannibal lecture”

"I’ll just put my notes here on my Hannibal lectern."